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Doctor Fitness: Healthy skin, Healthy aging, Anti-ageing

The skin is the largest organ of the body. An average man's skin covers more than 2 square yards and weighs 10 pounds. In just 1 square inch of skin, there are approximately 30 million cells, 100 fat glands, 600 sweat glands, 65 hairs, numerous muscles, and thousands of nerve endings. The human skin ranges in thickness from 0.5 millimetres in the eyelid to more than 2 millimeters in the palms and soles. 

• The skin performs an intricate role in human physiology:

• Protects the rest of the body from toxins, injuries, the sun, and temperature extremes in the external environment

• Preserves the stability of the body's inner environment and keeps it in place

• Helps the body to regulate heat

• Communicates information about physical and emotional states

• Provides identification through unique finger- and sole-prints


The appearance, elasticity, and aging of the skin is affected by both genes and environment and the way that they interact. Environmental features include diet, lifestyle, physical activity, sun exposure and many other factors. We also all have common genetic variants that affect processes critical to our skin health; however, because genes do not act alone, by making suitable changes in diet, lifestyle. We can exert some control over our apparent genetic destiny – with simple adjustments to our lives we can make significant improvements in our long term skin health, and even reduce/reverse effects of aging that have already appeared.

Areas covered by this test:


  • Skin structure and ageing
  • Oxidative Stress, Detoxification & Inflammation
  • Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)
  • Vascular tone & water retention

Skin health, blood & lymph circulation and conditions such as cellulite are interlinked at several levels. They involve complex processes that include microcirculation, local fat accumulation, hormonal factors, altered matrix metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory changes, and alterations in lymphatic drainage.

The panel provides information about the potential effect of your patient's genetic variation on your overall skin health and well-being. Since we focus mainly on research regarding gene x environment interactions the genetic information leads to specific personal modifications to your diet and lifestyle which can help with healthy skin aging and prevent or combat processes such as cellulite, water retention, and others.

The appearance, elasticity, and aging of the skin is affected by both genes and environment and the way that they interact. Environmental features include diet, lifestyle, physical activity, sun exposure, etc. We also all have common genetic variants that affect processes important to our skin health however because genes do not act alone, by making suitable changes in diet, lifestyle, etc. we can exert some control over our apparent genetic destiny – with simple adjustments to our lives we can make significant improvements in our long term skin health, and even reduce / reverse effects of ageing that have already appeared.

Skin Structure

We have looked at genes associated with the generation and maintenance of skin structure. Skin is “dynamic” it is continuously being broken down and rebuilt in response to external and internal stimuli (e.g., sunlight and metabolic oxidation). Skin surface appearance is determined by the elasticity and resilience of the underlying protein fibre structure, mainly cross-linked collagen and elastin fibers. The genes we test include collagen, elastin, and enzymes involved in the delicate remodeling process. Variations in these genes can have small effects on this process which can have significant long-term consequences for skin aging, but which can be ameliorated by taking protective measures.


Sensitivity to Refined Carbohydrates & Glycation:

Individual genetic variation affects your sensitivity towards refined carbohydrates – an increased sensitivity coupled with over-consumption of refined carbohydrates raises the likelihood of overweight and obesity. Carbohydrate sensitivity can also result in higher levels of glycemia, glycation, an increased probability of developing insulin resistance and eventually type 2 diabetes. These processes also contribute to the development of non-enzymatic modification of proteins in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) which are implicated as detrimental in various processes important for skin health, vascular tone, cellulite, and physiological aging. Once formed, AGEs tend to gravitate toward dermal collagen and elastin. Common symptoms of skin with glycation issues include premature aging, such as wrinkling and sagging; weakened elastin and collagen; and a reduced ability for skin to quickly rehabilitate. The presence of AGEs also makes the skin more vulnerable to oxidative stress, smoking and UV exposure.


Address

Nutri-Genetica Research AG
Schweigwiesstrasse 12
CH-8835 Feusisberg /SZ

Contacts

Email: info@nutri-genetica.com
Phone: 0 41 514 09 96